SFLC News: 2018 [RSS]

Video recordings of our 2018 Fall Conference are now available in several formats. If you missed the event, or if you’d like to see it again, visit https://softwarefreedom.org/events/2018/annual-conference/records/.

We have also uploaded all of the videos to our YouTube channel. You can find the videos organized in order in a playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jj8LPmKUbE&list=PLE_V0MD-4ldDdbI-nNUB3NVKeUX1EppZQ.


On November 7th, 2018, Intellectual Property Watch published an article by David Branigan titled “‘Peace Has Broken Out’ In Software Development, Heralding Open Source As The Future”. The article, which is only available to subscribers of Intellectual Property Watch, details the discussions about patent peace at SFLC’s 2018 Fall Conference, which took place on Friday, November, 2nd, 2018.

The article begins by documenting one notable panel discussion at our conference featuring Eben Moglen, Keith Bergelt of the Open Invention Network, and Nicolas Schifano of Microsoft. It also reports on an exclusive interview with Eben Moglen conducted by Intellectual Property Watch’s David Branigan after the conference. The interview explores how peace was won between the FOSS community and big technology companies.


The Software Freedom Law Center is excited to welcome you to our 14th Anniversary Fall Conference cohosted by Columbia Law School on Friday, November 2nd, 2018. Below, please find our complete conference program as well as information pertaining to CLE credits. We invite counsel, developers, enterprise users, and other members of free and open source software (FOSS) communities to join us once again for our free annual conference to explore legal issues surrounding FOSS.


The Software Freedom Law Center is proud to make available a whitepaper by Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical, Ltd., and Eben Moglen, Founding Director of the Software Freedom Law Center and Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. The whitepaper shows how new capabilities in the free and open source software stack enable highly regulated and sensitive industrial concerns to take advantage of the full spectrum of modern copyleft software.


The Software Freedom Law Center is pleased to announce our 14th Anniversary Fall Conference cohosted by Columbia Law School on Friday, November 2, 2018. We will bring together counsel, developers, enterprise users, and other members of free and open source software (FOSS) communities to join us in exploring legal issues surrounding FOSS.


Professor Eben Moglen has issued a statement on the significance of the Supreme Court’s decision in Carpenter v. United States. Eben Moglen is the President, Executive Director, and Founder of the Software Freedom Law Center and Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, where he teaches the courses Law in the Internet Society and Computers, Privacy and the Law, among other courses. He is a legal expert on the Fourth Amendment, constitutional law, privacy law, and the governance of emerging digital technologies.


On June 14, 2018, Eben Moglen and Mishi Choudhary published an editorial in Firstpost titled “Asserting control over data by enforcing data localisation policies is wrong”.

“Localisation seems like a beneficial means of expressing digital sovereignty. In fact, it imposes severe costs that far outweigh its benefits. In societies not governed by the rule of law, localisation amplifies the power of the organs of oppression, just as the form of ‘personal localisation’ represented by the Berlin Wall and the Iron Curtain amplified the power of Stasi and the KGB….”


On May 31, 2018, Eben Moglen and Mishi Choudhary published an editorial in The Times of India titled “Globalise identity, not aadhaar: Using one single database and identity management scheme for everything will not work”.

“…Privacy cannot be assured at all, illegal government surveillance cannot be prevented, and protection of the economy from widespread crime is impossible if government mandatorily collects information capable of compromising every citizen’s identity and then takes no responsibility for the management of risks downstream.”



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